Creatives Do Not Stay In a Job for More Than Five Years

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    Work in the creative industry

    A survey by recruiting agency Aquent / Vitamin T found that 96% of creative and marketing professionals will leave a job within the next five years, citing the main reason for lack of career progression.

    The creative industries are volatile with high staff turnover according to new research showing that most professionals do not stay in a job for more than five years.

    The research was conducted by creative recruiting agency Aquent / Vitamin T in January this year, and saw 229 people working in creative, marketing and digital jobs surveyed, including permanent employees and freelancers. 155 of these were creative professionals. Most were between 26 and 34 years old, and there was a division from 54% female to 46% male.

    Half of creatives say they work more than normal hours

    Creatives don't stay in a job for more than five years.
    Creatives don’t stay in a job for more than five years.

    It was found that 96% of the respondents say they do not stay in a job for more than five years, and half of the respondents say they leave the job within two years.

    Half of creative and marketing professionals also say they work longer than their hired hours; 50% of those surveyed work after hours, with creative professionals working 40 hours a week on average, which is three hours more than the national average. Salespeople work more than this, at 43 hours a week on average.

    A quarter of creatives also say they have concerns about adapting and growing conservative duties at their job, while three-quarters of creative freelancers say this is the main reason they left a permanent role to work. on their own. Other common reasons for leaving full-time jobs include workload and the newfound ability to be your own boss.

    Three-quarters are happy at their jobs

    Creatives do not stay in a job for more than five years: phrases quotes for designers
    Creatives don’t stay in a job for more than five years.

    Despite working longer hours than the national average, less than a fifth of creatives (16%) do not feel supported at work. Almost three-quarters, 70%, say they are happy in their current role.

    More than a third, 35%, consider that the main reason for leaving their job is lack of career progression, in terms of salary and role. Other less common reasons for leaving include poor management and unappreciated sentiment, each of which was mentioned by a tenth of respondents.

    Mike Berry, UK manager at Aquent / Vitamin T, says: “Companies must find an effective way not only to develop, but to retain good people.

    “Our research indicates that ensuring that staff can advance throughout the career and receive structured training development is key to keeping people on board.

    “Employees want to be recognized for their work and effort. If employees feel valued, their job satisfaction is more likely to increase, along with their work time. “

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